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Roger Macdivitt .

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RE: Post 1900 Peruvian art
5/12/2013 8:09:03 PM
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Hi Roger and friends,

Though unfamiliar for the most part with
Jose de la Barra's art, I love most of his paintings. I appreciate your posting them, Roger. May I say, you are right in your love of color. Jose de la Barra's use of it is fantastic, as fantastic as his subjects are. In my opinion, he is wonderful as an artist, a winner in every sense.



It is different with Boris Vallejo, he looks to me more an American from U.S.A than a Peruvian; and while his art is indeed spectacular, it is apparently limited to the world of fantasy you see in cartoons. However, and it is with deep regret that I say this, I would need to know it better before giving a more specific opinion.

As to Amilcar Zorrilla: again, I would like to know his work better as to be frank, I find the abstract and the self-portrait (I am assuming it is a self-portrait)
extraordinary; but the Indians with the stepped pyramid in the background would seem to be painted by another artist, possibly a Mexican one, as this work looks very much like some aboriginal frescoes in the Maya or the Aztec ruins do. But this of course is only my opinion and it may be wrong.

Hugs,

Miguel

Thanks Miguel,

It's my aim with my South American forums to stir some interest in too little a discussed area of art. So many pre 1900 artists were trained in what we might call Western or widely European styles and it took movements like the impressionists to break away from that mould. Some of the artists that I bring may be popular artists but I feel that one day their work will be appreciated for their depiction of the modern mind.

I am glad that not every artist here is the group of GOOD artists but appeal to many. After all, most artists need either self-satisfaction or the applause of the world in general. As long as peoplr are honest in their views a comment about my work spurs me to do better or to follow a certain course. What I am discovering is that to make a living as an artist you have to be good or give people what they like. I suspect that knowing the history of European art a little, that I'm not the first aspiring artist to discover this?


Roger, I have just visited Amilcar Salomon Zorrilla's website here. The paintings you posted are exhibited there among a lot of other works - apparently small frescoes - most of which follow the same pattern depicting aboriginal themes of such pre-Inca ancient cultures as the Mochica, in Peru, and the Tiahuanaco in Bolivia, which in many ways were more akin to the Aztec and the Maya cultures than to the Inca - hence my believing them to be Aztec or Maya. They all seem to constitute his life's work and are offered for sale. Here is the last one in the section "16 Pre-Incan Cultures"' of the site:

Amilcar Salomon Zorrilla - Centuries of Libertarian Struggle
(Mural, 14.5 x 20 inch)

That is great information Miguel.

Yes, it seems to be a Pre-Inca theme.

There is a similarity in his works, namely the faces, but these seem different to his other work.

Roger

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Luis Miguel Goitizolo

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RE: Post 1900 Peruvian art
5/12/2013 10:01:48 PM
Quote:
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Hi Roger and friends,

Though unfamiliar for the most part with
Jose de la Barra's art, I love most of his paintings. I appreciate your posting them, Roger. May I say, you are right in your love of color. Jose de la Barra's use of it is fantastic, as fantastic as his subjects are. In my opinion, he is wonderful as an artist, a winner in every sense.



It is different with Boris Vallejo, he looks to me more an American from U.S.A than a Peruvian; and while his art is indeed spectacular, it is apparently limited to the world of fantasy you see in cartoons. However, and it is with deep regret that I say this, I would need to know it better before giving a more specific opinion.

As to Amilcar Zorrilla: again, I would like to know his work better as to be frank, I find the abstract and the self-portrait (I am assuming it is a self-portrait)
extraordinary; but the Indians with the stepped pyramid in the background would seem to be painted by another artist, possibly a Mexican one, as this work looks very much like some aboriginal frescoes in the Maya or the Aztec ruins do. But this of course is only my opinion and it may be wrong.

Hugs,

Miguel

Thanks Miguel,

It's my aim with my South American forums to stir some interest in too little a discussed area of art. So many pre 1900 artists were trained in what we might call Western or widely European styles and it took movements like the impressionists to break away from that mould. Some of the artists that I bring may be popular artists but I feel that one day their work will be appreciated for their depiction of the modern mind.

I am glad that not every artist here is the group of GOOD artists but appeal to many. After all, most artists need either self-satisfaction or the applause of the world in general. As long as peoplr are honest in their views a comment about my work spurs me to do better or to follow a certain course. What I am discovering is that to make a living as an artist you have to be good or give people what they like. I suspect that knowing the history of European art a little, that I'm not the first aspiring artist to discover this?


Roger, I have just visited Amilcar Salomon Zorrilla's website here. The paintings you posted are exhibited there among a lot of other works - apparently small frescoes - most of which follow the same pattern depicting aboriginal themes of such pre-Inca ancient cultures as the Mochica, in Peru, and the Tiahuanaco in Bolivia, which in many ways were more akin to the Aztec and the Maya cultures than to the Inca - hence my believing them to be Aztec or Maya. They all seem to constitute his life's work and are offered for sale. Here is the last one in the section "16 Pre-Incan Cultures"' of the site:

Amilcar Salomon Zorrilla - Centuries of Libertarian Struggle
(Mural, 14.5 x 20 inch)

That is great information Miguel.

Yes, it seems to be a Pre-Inca theme.

There is a similarity in his works, namely the faces, but these seem different to his other work.

Roger


I forgot to tell, his work is said to hold similarity with that of Mexican artist Diego Rivera, which may explain why it somehow looked to me as Mexican.

Miguel

"Choose a job you love and you will not have to work a day in your life" (Confucius)

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Roger Macdivitt .

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RE: Post 1900 Peruvian art
5/13/2013 6:13:24 AM

Ah, That explains things Miguel.

Roger

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Roger Macdivitt .

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RE: Post 1900 Peruvian art
5/14/2013 7:34:46 PM

If required I can bring more information about this artist

FERNANDO de SZYSZLO

Fernando De Szyszlo Valdelomar (born July 5, 1925 in Lima) is a Peruvian artist who is a key figure in advancing abstract art in Latin America since the mid-1950s, and one of the leading plastic artists in Peru.

Studies and influences

Szyszlo studied at the School of Plastic Arts of the Pontifical Catholic University of Peru. At the age of 24 he traveled to Europe where he studied the works of the masters, particularly Rembrandt, Titian and Tintoretto, and absorbed the varied influences of cubism, surrealism, informalism, and abstraction. While in Paris he met Octavio Paz and André Breton and frequented the group of writers and intellectuals that met regularly at the Cafe Flore engaging in vigorous discussions on how they could participate in the international modern movement while preserving their Latin American cultural identity. Upon his return to Peru, Szyszlo became a major force for artistic renewal in his country breaking new ground by expressing a Peruvian subject matter in a non-representational style. He was married to a Peruvian poet Blanca Varela, with whom he has two children.

At the age of 24 he traveled to Europe where he studied the works of the masters, particularly Rembrandt, Titian and Tintoretto, and absorbed the varied influences of cubism, surrealism, informalism and abstraction. While in Paris he met Octavio Paz and Andre Breton and frequented the group of writers and intellectuals that met regularly at the Cafe Flore engaging in vigorous discussions on how they could participate in the international modern movement while preserving their Latin American cultural identity. Upon his return to Peru, Szyszlo became a major force for artistic renewal in his country breaking new ground by expressing a Peruvian subject matter in a non-representational style. Lyricism of color enriched by rich textural effects and a masterly handling of light and shadow are hallmarks of Szyszlo's painting. Highly identified with the linking of ancient cultures to a modernist artistic language, Szyszlo's art reflects a broad culture that draws on many sources from philosophy and science to literature

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Myrna Ferguson

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RE: Post 1900 Peruvian art
5/14/2013 11:42:40 PM
Hi Roger,

I really like this kind of art work. It just keeps you guessing what the artist had in mind.

Myrna

LOVE IS THE ANSWER
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