Menu



error This forum is not active, and new posts may not be made in it.
Promote
Roger Macdivitt .

3169
7333 Posts
7333
Invite Me as a Friend
Top 25 Poster
Person Of The Week
Re: English as a first language is hard enough, think of those still struggling with it.
8/2/2009 3:30:07 AM

Luis,

Great post. You have thought this through very well.

I think that Spanish is a beautiful language. It seems to carry more passion than Italian but less harshness than German.

English is such a massive combination of things. Scottish, Welsh and Irish English can be very different.

Roger

 

+0
Roger Macdivitt .

3169
7333 Posts
7333
Invite Me as a Friend
Top 25 Poster
Person Of The Week
Re: English as a first language is hard enough, think of those still struggling with it.
7/13/2012 8:51:57 PM

This was a fun forum for a while.

If you haven't read through it it may make you smile.

+0
Roger Macdivitt .

3169
7333 Posts
7333
Invite Me as a Friend
Top 25 Poster
Person Of The Week
Re: English as a first language is hard enough, think of those still struggling with it.
7/13/2012 8:56:34 PM

A Rant about Grammar

We are "outside" today -- sign in front of store, Albany, NY

Let's review a few basic rules of English grammar.

Basic Grammar

Its and It's

Its is possessive. [The cat hurt its paw.]
It's is a contraction. [It's a mistake.]

Your and You're

Your is possessive. [Your experiment went awry.]
You're is a contraction. [You're wrong.]

Whose and Who's

Whose is possessive. [Whose shoes are these?]
Who's is a contraction. [Who's at the door?]

Quotation marks

Quotation marks are used to indicate that somebody said something. They are not used to add emphasis.

Incorrect:

We are "outside" today.

Simple rule: restrict use of quotes to something spoken.

Advanced Bonus round: Try and

It's common in English to use try and instead of try to. An example is I'm going to try and eat an entire dog.. This implies two separate actions: trying and eating. What our speaker has literally said is redundant:

  1. She is going to try [to eat an entire dog, we presume];
  2. She is going to eat an entire dog.

So there's really no reason for her to try: she said she is going to eat an entire dog. What our speaker really means is that she is going to try to eat an entire dog.

Grammar as it Should Be

I disagree with some of the rules of grammar. This is the section in which I tilt with windmills.

Punctuating Quotations

English has some very stupid grammar rules regarding punctuating quotations. The oddest has to be its rule of punctuating a quotation at the end of a sentence. Logically, the punctuation of the quotation and the quoting sentence itself may differ, but they are squashed together in English:

Hip said, "Sit quite still, Gerry."

This doesn't make sense. The enclosing sentence above ends; it should be followed immediately by a period, to mark that it too has ended:

Hip said, "Sit quite still, Gerry.".

The accepted rule is to move the punctuation inside the quotes if it's not an exclamation point or question mark. Is this better or worse than always punctuating both the enclosed and enclosing sentences?

-ical Adjectives

Adjectives can be made out of nouns by adding the ending "ic". Here are some examples:

  • graphic
  • economic
  • grammatic

It's the fashion of the time to create new adjectives by adding "al" to the end of familiar words. Here are some examples:

  • graphical
  • economical
  • grammatical

If you've been paying attention, you will realize that we just made adjectives out of adjectives. These adjectives are redundant. So let's replace "graphical user interface" with "graphic user interface" and "grammatical error" with "grammatic error".

Heavy going?

Yes, but interesting stuff. I think.

+0
Kathleen Vanbeekom

11447
13305 Posts
13305
Invite Me as a Friend
Top 25 Poster
Person Of The Week
RE: English as a first language is hard enough, think of those still struggling with it.
7/13/2012 9:21:37 PM

Hi Roger,

Even if teams have an even amount of players and are on an even playing field, each person's abilities are not even.

It's odd how some people don't like odd numbers.

We like the word "even" even more than the word odd, I couldn't even think of an odd number of definitions for that word.

+0
Roger Macdivitt .

3169
7333 Posts
7333
Invite Me as a Friend
Top 25 Poster
Person Of The Week
RE: English as a first language is hard enough, think of those still struggling with it.
7/13/2012 10:07:35 PM
Quote:

Hi Roger,

Even if teams have an even amount of players and are on an even playing field, each person's abilities are not even.

It's odd how some people don't like odd numbers.

We like the word "even" even more than the word odd, I couldn't even think of an odd number of definitions for that word.

Kathleen,

It's odd that you noticed this. Even though I thought it odd it's even stranger when it's noticed by the odd passer by that even odd people might wear odd socks with even patterning on them. Ooooooooheeeeeee.

I love this stupid language.

Should I have said sox?

Roger

+0


facebook
Like us on Facebook!