Menu



error This forum is not active, and new posts may not be made in it.
Promote
Roger Macdivitt .

3169
7333 Posts
7333
Invite Me as a Friend
Top 25 Poster
Person Of The Week
RE: The wonderful world of the Self Portrait
9/3/2013 7:46:47 PM
Quote:

Wonderful works, Roger. I especially love this one.

The falls of Clyde (Corra Linn)

Hugs,

Miguel

Miguel,

I knew that you would enjoy this painting as, although the forum is about self-portraits this painting really explains this artist's skills.

+1
Roger Macdivitt .

3169
7333 Posts
7333
Invite Me as a Friend
Top 25 Poster
Person Of The Week
RE: The wonderful world of the Self Portrait
9/3/2013 8:25:40 PM

Gabriel Metsu (1629 – 69)

Gabriel Metsu (Leiden - buried Oct 24, 1667, Amsterdam), Dutch painter, was the son of the Flemish painter Jacques Metsu (c.1588-1629), who lived most of his days at Leiden, where he was three times married. The last of these marriages was celebrated in 1625, and Jacomijntje Garniers, herself the widow of a painter with already three children, gave birth to Gabriel.

According to Houbraken Metsu was taught by Gerard Dou, though his early works do not lend colour to this assertion. He was influenced by painters in Leiden like Jan Steen and Jan Lievens, later by Frans van Mieris the Elder.

Metsu was registered among the first members of the painters' corporation at Leiden; and the books of the guild also tell us that he remained a member in 1649. In 1650 he ceased to subscribe, and works bearing his name and the date of 1653 support the belief that he had moved to Amsterdam. In Leiden it was told Metsu left a brothel at six in the morning and took a prostitute to the Academia. Before he moved to Amsterdam Metsu was trained in Utrecht by Jan Baptist Weenix and Nicolaus Knüpfer.

In Amsterdam Metsu lived in an alley on Prinsengracht, where he kept chickens. He got into an argument with a neighbor and moved to a house on the canalside, where a daily vegetable market was held. In 1658 he married Isabella de Wolff, whose father was a potter, her mother a painter. (Pieter de Grebber, a religious painter from Haarlem was her brother). The Speed Art Museum has a portrait of the couple.

Around the year 1661 Metsu won the protection of the Amsterdam cloth merchant Jan J. Hinlopen and painted his family more than once in a fashionable surrounding. After Metsu died his widow left for Enkhuizen, to live with her mother.

This link is worth visiting

I am sorry that this image is so small but research of this artist's work is a must for the lovers of 17th C Dutch painters.

This is widely thought to be the artist himself. He specialised in informal portraits.

A Baker Blowing his Horn, Ganriel Metsu

A Baker blowing his horn,

again, thought to be a self portrait.

He aged badly but acheived much in a short life.

+1
Roger Macdivitt .

3169
7333 Posts
7333
Invite Me as a Friend
Top 25 Poster
Person Of The Week
RE: The wonderful world of the Self Portrait
9/3/2013 8:39:01 PM

At last a lady. AND WHAT LADY?

Cecile Walton

(1891 - 1956)

This painting shows the artist as the mother, holding up the newborn baby. She gazes with solemn adoration and wonderment, the other child looks on with a serious look of deep thought at the changes taking place. This is a very 1920's treatment. Cecile Walton was a wonderful illustrator.

File:Cecile Walton00.jpg

Romance - 1920

.................................................................................

Cecile Walton (29 March 1891 – 23 April 1956), was a Scottish painter, illustrator and sculptor. She and her husband Eric were two of the moving spirits of the Edinburgh chapter of the Symbolist movement in the early 20th century.

She was born in Glasgow, the daughter of the artists Helen and Edward Arthur Walton. At an early age her family moved to London, where she began her art studies. She also attended the Edinburgh College of Art, the Académie de la Grande Chaumière and spent some time in Florence. Against her parents' advice, she married her fellow Edinburgh student, Eric Harald Macbeth Robertson (1887-1941) in 1914. Eric had abandoned architecture and turned to art. He was described as “one of the most brilliant art students of his period”. They had two sons, the first, Gavril, born in February 1915 and the second, Edward, in December 1919.

Eric, Cecile and the painter Dorothy Johnstone (1892-1980) had formed a close painting and physical liaison, but Eric's excessive drinking led in 1923 to the collapse of the trio and Cecile's moving in with Dorothy. Her painting career foundered with their marriage, and she turned to the theatre and working for BBC radio. Eric's career also collapsed after their separation, and he eventually succumbed to alcohol.[1]

She is best known for her ironic self-portrait Romance, in which she depicts herself as a latter-day Olympia, critically inspecting her younger son.

+1
Luis Miguel Goitizolo

1162
61587 Posts
61587
Invite Me as a Friend
Top 25 Poster
Person Of The Week
RE: The wonderful world of the Self Portrait
9/3/2013 9:36:24 PM
Quote:

El Greco, here brings us

The Adoration of The Shepherds

1612-14

El Greco appears here, second figure from the right, his hands raised in adoration.



Roger, the last time I posted about The Greco appearing in this painting, I forgot to say that I used to believe that he is the first figure from the left and not the second figure from the right, as you pointed out here. But now I see that while viewed from different angles, both figures are virtually identical, their hands are raised in adoration in both cases, and the only differences between them derive from their different positions. Of course I am not sure, but it is curious, isn't it, that The Greco represented himself twice in this work.

Miguel

"Choose a job you love and you will not have to work a day in your life" (Confucius)

+1
Roger Macdivitt .

3169
7333 Posts
7333
Invite Me as a Friend
Top 25 Poster
Person Of The Week
RE: The wonderful world of the Self Portrait
9/4/2013 8:17:34 AM
Quote:
Quote:

El Greco, here brings us

The Adoration of The Shepherds

1612-14

El Greco appears here, second figure from the right, his hands raised in adoration.



Roger, the last time I posted about The Greco appearing in this painting, I forgot to say that I used to believe that he is the first figure from the left and not the second figure from the right, as you pointed out here. But now I see that while viewed from different angles, both figures are virtually identical, their hands are raised in adoration in both cases, and the only differences between them derive from their different positions. Of course I am not sure, but it is curious, isn't it, that The Greco represented himself twice in this work.

Miguel

Miguel,

After finding out how many times Gabriel Metsu used his own image to portray so many different characters I wouldn't be surprised if El Greco didn't do the same, after all, they would be available to students and probably knew their own image well.

I got my information from a book source which is pretty reliable.

Roger

+1


facebook
Like us on Facebook!