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Luis Miguel Goitizolo

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RE: The Surrealist Phenomenon - SALVADOR DALI
11/29/2012 2:24:09 AM
Well Kathleen, if I am not mistaken, this is precisely the painting that caused an uproar in the world of art when it was first exhibited and whether in shock or enthusiasm, it opened the gates of fame to Dali.

Personally I have never been too enthusiastic about this work and while I recognize it is a great painting and that it would probably not be that great without the clocks, all the same those flaccid objects don't appeal to me in the least; but I may be wrong and my view too subjective. In addition, it is precisely the clocks that give the painting its distinctive look and caused the uproar.

Dali seems to have had every conceivable sort of obsessions along his life, but if we are to believe the psychoanalysts, all of them might have had an underlying sexual motivation. But, can crosses have that sort of hidden motivation? I really doubt it. On the other hand, religion can become an obsessive mystic phenomenon in certain individuals and, want it or not, there is a saying that opposite ends touch each other.

Hugs,

Miguel

P.S. As to crosses in Salvador Dali's paintings, please take a look at my next post. :)


Salvador Dali - The Persistence of Memory (oil on canvas, 1931)

Quote:
Hi Luis Miguel,

I've noticed the melted clocks in Dali's paintings more often than I noticed crosses, maybe that's because melted clocks are more unusual.

The painting of the ship seems more normal than a lot of his other works.

I liked the video slideshow, especially the two where the body and face were broken/divided into portions of geometrics or circles.

"Choose a job you love and you will not have to work a day in your life" (Confucius)

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Luis Miguel Goitizolo

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RE: The Surrealist Phenomenon - SALVADOR DALI
11/29/2012 11:04:26 PM

SALVADOR DALI AND CROSSES

First off, I would like to point out that I don't think Dali was obsessed with crosses as he was with watches. My guess is he was rather obsessed with religion and since he had been born and raised in Spain, a Catholic country to the core (in his time at least), his obsession - or rather fixation - mainly was with Catholicism, to a degree that he even came at odds with it in his later years. In a metaphysical sense he was obsessed, of all esoteric notions, with that of a Center of the World where a Cosmic Christ, in opposition to the Christ in our individual hearts, resides.

This can be perceived in such master works as
his most famous Christ of Saint John of the Cross of 1951, in his Aritmosophic Cross of 1952, in his Crucifixion (Christ Hypercubus) of 1954, and even in his exquisite The Discovery of America by Christopher Columbus of 1958-59, featured in this thread; et cetera. I am only posting the first three master works mentioned.

(More on this later)


Christ of Saint John of the Cross (oil on canvas, 1951)

Aritmosophic Cross (oil on canvas, 1952)

Crucifixion (Christ Hypercubus) (oil on canvas, 1954)

"Choose a job you love and you will not have to work a day in your life" (Confucius)

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Roger Macdivitt .

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RE: The Surrealist Phenomenon - SALVADOR DALI
11/29/2012 11:46:27 PM

Miguel,

Fascinating stuff. Anything that causes people to think and speculate has value to me.

Coupled with beauty it ticks all of my boxes.

Roger

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Luis Miguel Goitizolo

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RE: The Surrealist Phenomenon - SALVADOR DALI
11/30/2012 2:37:05 AM
Yes Roger, Dali causes precisely that effect in me. No one could have said it better than you. And not only his art, Dali himself is certainly fascinating.

By the way, I love the way you put it, "ticks all of my boxes." lol

Miguel

"Choose a job you love and you will not have to work a day in your life" (Confucius)

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Luis Miguel Goitizolo

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RE: The Surrealist Phenomenon - SALVADOR DALI
11/30/2012 3:01:57 AM

PAINTING THE FOURTH DIMENSION


(Two very different, but equaly fascinating, interpretations of The Sacrament of the Last Supper (1955)



Salvador Dali - Sacrament of the Last Supper (1955)

"Could he also have been an initiate? No-one has asked the question, and at present, one should only pose it, merely noting that in “The Last Supper” (1955), God is painted without a head – echoes of Jean Cocteau’s mural inside Notre Dame de France Church in London, a mural claimed to be linked with Cocteau’s initiatory alliances. Dali frequently used this headless divinity, including “The Ecumenical Council”. And in "The Last Supper", is the position of the divinity not similar to Leonardo's infamous Vitruvian Man?
In the already cited “Searching for the Fourth Dimension” from 1979, we see the alchemist at work: there are allusions to Einstein's space/time theories, by means of the wheels next to the cave – both concave and convex – and the sprawling soft watch. But what to make of the couple with their backs to the painter, a reference to Plato and Aristotle in “The School of Athens” by Raphael – which in itself has a rich history of esoteric acclaim? And why did he believe that Europe would be “abducted” from Perpignan, where centuries before an apocalyptic preacher, Vincent Ferrer, made similar claims… claims apparently supported by the exiled pope Benedict XIII?"

"Earth, air, water and fire were, according to Platonic philosophy, the four basic elements of which everything in the universe is composed. Plato assigned to each of those, on a rather intuitive basis, a regular solid: the sharp tetrahedron for the fire; the spinning octahedron for the air; the stable cube for the earth; and the rolling icosahedron for the water. Plato thought of the fifth possible regular solid, the dodecahedron, as what “…God used for arranging the constellations on the whole heaven” (Timaeus 55), a geometric solid representing the universe. In the “Sacrament of the Last Supper”, Salvador Dali positions the final meal of Jesus and the Apostles inside a room shaped as a dodecahedron, possibly to signify the cosmic proportions of the event."

From: The peacocks' tail


"Choose a job you love and you will not have to work a day in your life" (Confucius)

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