Menu



Promote
Jim
Jim Allen

5822
11244 Posts
11244
Invite Me as a Friend
Top 25 Poster
Person Of The Week
RE: Let's Talk In the Kitchen Gets Social - Feel Free to Post ~ No Affiliate Links~
2/14/2014 11:04:22 PM

Free Ebook: How to Create a Love Story Between Sales & Marketing

It can sometimes feel like marketers are from Venus and salespeople are from Mars. Only 6% of salespeople think marketing gives them perfect fit leads and 59% of marketers admit they have no formal agreement with sales to determine both teams' responsibilities.

HubSpot and LinkedIn have joined forces to survey salespeople and marketers around the globe to get to the heart of the matter and find out what the real pain points are between these two teams

May Wisdom and the knowledge you gained go with you,



Jim Allen III
Skype: JAllen3D
Everything You Need For Online Success


New Reply
+0
Jim
Jim Allen

5822
11244 Posts
11244
Invite Me as a Friend
Top 25 Poster
Person Of The Week
RE: Let's Talk In the Kitchen Gets Social - Feel Free to Post ~ No Affiliate Links~
2/27/2014 1:19:25 AM

Yes, There Are Paid Government Trolls On Social Media, Blogs, Forums And Websites

Troll Warning - Photo by GilDo you want solid proof that paid government shills are targeting websites, blogs, forums and social media accounts? For years, many have suspected that government trolls have been systematically causing havoc all over the Internet, but proving it has been difficult. But now thanks to documents leaked by Edward Snowden and revealed by Glenn Greenwald, we finally have hard evidence that western governments have been doing this. As you will see below, a UK intelligence outfit known as the Government Communications Headquarters, through a previously secret unit known as the Joint Threat Research Intelligence Group, has been systematically attempting “to control, infiltrate, manipulate, and warp online discourse”. This should be deeply disturbing to anyone that values free speech on the Internet.

It isn’t just that the British government is trying to influence what people are thinking. The reality is that this is far bigger than a mere propaganda campaign. As Greenwald recently noted on his new website, the “integrity of the Internet itself” is at stake…

By publishing these stories one by one, our NBC reporting highlighted some of the key, discrete revelations: themonitoring of YouTube and Blogger, the targeting of Anonymous with the very same DDoS attacks they accuse “hacktivists” of using, the use of “honey traps” (luring people into compromising situations using sex) and destructive viruses. But, here, I want to focus and elaborate on the overarching point revealed by all of these documents: namely, that these agencies are attempting to control, infiltrate, manipulate, and warp online discourse, and in doing so, are compromising the integrity of the internet itself.


So what techniques are the British using to control and manipulate discourse on the Internet? According to Greenwald, the documents that Snowden has uncovered show that they are willing to sink to despicable lows in order to get the results that they desire…

Among the core self-identified purposes of JTRIG are two tactics: (1) to inject all sorts of false material onto the internet in order to destroy the reputation of its targets; and (2) to use social sciences and other techniques tomanipulate online discourse and activism to generate outcomes it considers desirable. To see how extremist these programs are, just consider the tactics they boast of using to achieve those ends: “false flag operations” (posting material to the internet and falsely attributing it to someone else), fake victim blog posts (pretending to be a victim of the individual whose reputation they want to destroy), and posting “negative information” on various forums.


The following is a list of Internet infiltration techniques that were listed on one particular slide that Snowden leaked…

-Infiltration Operation

-Ruse Operation

-Set Piece Operation

-False Flag Operation

-False Rescue Operation

-Disruption Operation

-Sting Operation

You can check out this slide for yourself right here.

There is also evidence that the Canadian government has been involved in this sort of thing as well. The following comes from Natural News

You’ve probably run into them before — those seemingly random antagonizers who always end up diverting the conversation in an online chat room or article comment section away from the issue at hand, and towards a much different agenda. Hot-button issues like illegal immigration, the two-party political system, the “war on terror” and even alternative medicine are among the most common targets of such attackers, known as internet “trolls” or “shills,” who in many cases are nothing more than paid lackeys hired by the federal government and other international organizations to sway and ultimately control public opinion.

Several years ago, Canada’s CTV News aired a short segment about how its own government had been exposed for hiring secret agents to monitor social media and track online conversations, as well as the activities of certain dissenting individuals. This report, which in obvious whitewashing language referred to such activities as the government simply “weighing in and correcting” allegedly false information posted online, basically admitted that the Canadian government had assumed the role of secret online police.



You can see a video news report about this activity up in Canada right here.

Are you disturbed yet?

You should be.

So what kind of people are the governments of the western world targeting online?

Well, when it comes to the U.S. government, all you have to do is to look at their official documents to see who they consider the “problems” to be. For much more on this, please see my previous article entitled “72 Types Of Americans That Are Considered ‘Potential Terrorists’ In Official Government Documents“.

Sadly, the reality of the matter is that the days of the free and open Internet are numbered. The governments of the world are increasing their control over the Internet with each passing day, and eventually a time will likely come when we will not be able to communicate openly like this any longer.

Things have gotten so bad in the U.S. already that even Google is spooked

A recent court decision that endorsed a broad view of the Federal Communications Commission’s authority over the Internet has Google and other Web companies nervous.

In closed-door meetings with regulators and Capitol Hill staff, Google’s lawyers have said they’re worried how the FCC may use its newfound powers, according to multiple people familiar with the meetings.

The extent of the FCC’s authority over Google and other Web services remains unclear, and the current FCC has given no indication that it is interested in pushing aggressive new regulations. But the possibility that the commission could begin telling Google how to organize its search results or handle its users’ data is enough to spook the company’s army of Washington lobbyists.



And this is just the beginning.

If you think that the control freaks that are running things now are bad, just wait until you see the next generation of control freaks.

For example, there is one prominent student writer at Harvard that apparently believes that free speech at her university should be abolished and that any professor that does not advocate for her politically-correct version of “justice” should be fired

A student writer at Harvard University is raising eyebrows after publishing her belief that free speech on campus should be abolished and professors with opposing views be fired.

Sandra Korn, a senior who writes a column for the Harvard Crimson newspaper, thinks radical leftism is the only permissible political philosophy, and the First Amendment only hinders colleges from brainwashing students with her viewpoint.

“Let’s give up on academic freedom in favor of justice,” states the subtitle of her Feb. 18 column, in which she insists Harvard stop guaranteeing students and professors the right to hold controversial views and conduct research putting liberalism in a negative light.

“If our university community opposes racism, sexism, and heterosexism, why should we put up with research that counters our goals?” Korn asks.



This is what control freaks always want.

They always want to shut down those that are presenting opposing views.

They don’t believe in free speech and a “marketplace of ideas”. Rather, they believe in shoving what they believe down the rest of our throats.

And now we have solid proof that the governments of the western world are paying people to manipulate discourse on social media, blogs, forums and websites.

So will there be great outrage over this, or will the apathetic public just roll over and ignore this like they have so many other times the past few years?

Internet Troll - Photo by JNL

May Wisdom and the knowledge you gained go with you,



Jim Allen III
Skype: JAllen3D
Everything You Need For Online Success


New Reply
+1
Jim
Jim Allen

5822
11244 Posts
11244
Invite Me as a Friend
Top 25 Poster
Person Of The Week
RE: Let's Talk In the Kitchen Gets Social - Feel Free to Post ~ No Affiliate Links~
3/1/2014 9:20:48 PM

Linkedin's 'Share' Button: Here's The Secret Behind Its Disproportionate Power In Social Media

Linkedin is at least as powerful at driving traffic per click as a Twitter Tweet or a Facebook Like, according to Clearspring, a provider of those sharing buttons you often see at the top and bottom of web pages.

Go straight to the data >

Clearspring makes AddThis, a tool that allows brands and publishers to select and install buttons for Facebook Likes, Twitter Tweets and Linkedin Shares on their web sites.

Sharing buttons are becoming increasingly important to advertisers. A recommendation from a friend or colleague in a social network can be much more influential on your propensity to visit a web site than an ad on the TV or radio. Nissan's "Damned Ponies" ad, for instance, got 14 million views on YouTube in 2011 making it one of the most shared ads of the year.

They're crucial for ad sales, too: No traffic equals no ad exposures.

Linkedin doesn't drive as much total traffic as Facebook or Twitter because its network of members is much smaller than either of those companies. But on a per-share basis, it's at least as effective, according to Greg Cypes, director of product at Clearspring in McLean, Va.

For every article a user "shares" with her network, LinkedIn drives an average of 1.5 clicks back to the publisher. "That is better than the average across all of our networks, of about 1.1 clicks, and is about as effective as Twitter," Cypes says.

The networks available from AddThis include the obvious -- Facebook, Twitter -- along with the not-so-obvious, such as Messenger, Orkut and Vkontakte, a Russian social network. The network also includes the "print" and "email" buttons, which you've probably used without realizing they were sharing tools.

Over the following pages we' 'll examine the power of Linkedin Share, its place in the social media universe, and what it all means for advertisers and publishers.



Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/linkedins-share-button-the-secret-behind-disproportional-power-2011-12?op=1#ixzz2ukQ1UcUy

May Wisdom and the knowledge you gained go with you,



Jim Allen III
Skype: JAllen3D
Everything You Need For Online Success


New Reply
+1
Jim
Jim Allen

5822
11244 Posts
11244
Invite Me as a Friend
Top 25 Poster
Person Of The Week
How to Get Hacked in 5 Exciting Steps
3/4/2014 2:29:15 PM

How to Get Hacked in 5 Exciting Steps

Doing my morning reading, scanning and deleting emails this morning I came across this article and found it entertaining and Educational.

How to Get Hacked in 5 Exciting Steps


https://www.yahoo.com/tech/how-to-get-hacked-5-exciting-steps-77015513634.htmlimage

Most people probably don’t want to get hacked.

Most people don’t want their password stolen by some anonymous Eastern European teenager. They would not like discovering that they can’t get into their own email, Twitter, or Facebook accounts. They would find it embarrassing if their friends all started saying, “Did you know that I’m getting email spam from your account?”

But come on, people. What’s life without a little risk? Doesn’t some danger make everything more exciting? Why do you think so many people still text and drive? Why do you think people still bike without helmets, swim right after eating, and cut off the “DO NOT REMOVE” tags from their mattresses?

That’s right. Because risk makes everything more fun.

You’ve read endless articles about how to protect yourself online. And that’s fine if you’re a sheep, or you’re a chicken, or you want to plaster every surface of your life with bubble wrap.

But for those who seek the exhilaration of living dangerously, here it is at last: the first concise, authoritative guide to making yourself vulnerable online.

1. Choose an easy password. For years, the No. 1 most commonly chosen password in the world was the word “password.”

Of course, that’s also the world’s most easily guessed password. And there really are professional creeps out there whose job it is to guess passwords and get into accounts. They can actually sell name/password combinations in online hacker forums.

Fortunately, we’re making progress. According to SplashData’s annual Worst Passwords List, “password” is no longer the No. 1 most used password. It’s been surpassed — by “123456.” Good work, people.

If you’re some kind of risk-averse wussy, it’s easy enough to invent a password that’s not hard to memorize — but that no hacker can guess (and that no computer program can guess by trying every word in the dictionary, either). For example, you can compose a password from the initials of a fun phrase, like the delicious password “29gofiabm.” (That, of course, stands for “29 grams of fat in a Big Mac.”)

So, by all means, save yourself the mental strain of coming up with something hard to guess. Use “password,” “123456,” or another one of the Top 20 like “qwerty,” “iloveyou,” or “abc123.”

2. Use the same password for all your important online accounts. That’s right. Use that same, easy-to-memorize password for Yahoo, Facebook, Twitter, Amazon, your bank, and your credit cards. That way, if the bad guys manage to get their hands on one of your accounts, they can also get into all your others. Now you get to live dangerously and you’ve also made your life a lot easier. Only one password to memorize!

It’s possible to have a different password for every site without having to be a national memory champion. You could vary the password for each website — tacking on each site’s first initial at the end. For Facebook, “29gofiabmf,” for example; for Yahoo, “29gofiabmy.”

But you, the thrillseeker, would never bother. Nor would you bother installing a free password-management program like Dashlane or (for Apple products) iCloud Keychain. Those programs let you have a different, complex password for every site you visit — without your having to memorize anything at all!

But, hey. Where’s the thrill in that?

3. Don’t surrender your cellphone number as a security measure. These days, websites like Facebook, Gmail and Yahoo often ask you to provide your cellphone number.

image

They do that for three security reasons. First, if you forget your password or try to change it, they’ll send a new one to your phone for security.

Second, if the company gets hacked or your account gets locked for security reasons, the company has a quick way to alert you — by text message — and let you know the next steps.

Third, some websites, including Google, Facebook, Twitter and Yahoo Mail, offer an optional, super-hyper-secure feature called two-factor authentication. That user-hostile term means this: “The first time you log into your account from a new gadget, you have to enter a code that the company sends to you on your cellphone.” In other words, hackers using their own computers can never get into your accounts unless they also have your phone.

But you know what? All that’s for lily-livered pansies. Want to live on the edge? Keep your cellphone number to yourself!

4. When a bank or another company emails you to report a problem with your account, click the link and log in!

Most of the time, those are fake emails.

image

Clicking the link takes you to a fake website, dressed up to look like your bank’s (or eBay’s, or PayPal’s, or Amazon’s or whatever).

image

When you “log in” with your name and password, the bad guys intercept it. Now they know your name and password, so they can get into your real websites.

That particular scam — sending phony email that seems to be from your bank or another big company — is known as phishing (because they’re “fishing” for your information, get it?). And thousands of people every year get scammed that way.

If you think that maybe there really is a problem with your bank, or eBay, or Amazon account, you could open your browser and go log into the company’s website the usual way, not by clicking a link in an email.

If, however, you love the pulse-pounding adrenaline rush that comes from tempting fate, by all means — click the links in those emails and see what happens!

5. When troubles arise, pay for help. No big-name website — Yahoo, Google, Facebook, Twitter, Amazon — ever charges money to give you technical support. (Yahoo, in fact, even has a toll-free help number for “I can’t get into my account” problems: 1-800-318-0612.)

A bunch of bogus “help” sites do charge you, though. They pose as tech-support agencies that can solve problems with your account — for a fee, and often if you agree to give them remote control of your computer.

Only a sucker would fall for such a scheme — or a thrill-seeker like you!

So there you have it: the five easy steps to getting hacked and scammed. Why not make life more interesting for yourself? Start right away!

You’ll be in good company. Hundreds of thousands of people are already following exactly these steps today.

For real advice and information, also see:
* Weekend Project: Fix Your Passwords
* Why the Bad Guys Want Your Email

You can email David Pogue here. Yahoo Tech is a brand-new tech site from David Pogue and an all-star team of writers. Follow us on Facebook for all the latest.

May Wisdom and the knowledge you gained go with you,



Jim Allen III
Skype: JAllen3D
Everything You Need For Online Success


New Reply
+1
Jim
Jim Allen

5822
11244 Posts
11244
Invite Me as a Friend
Top 25 Poster
Person Of The Week
marketing-automation-social-and-more
3/5/2014 11:33:39 PM

Microsoft unifies almost everything in new Dynamics: CRM, marketing automation, social, and more


As many of you know and depend on Microsoft for your business backend needs and basically provides a backbone for almost everything. Microsoft says that isn't enough and is launching some "front end" products and services. Just read this summarization... Jim Allen III


Quote:
"
Microsoft is a cheaper solution.

That might sound surprising for a product that costs $200 per user per month in its online SaaS version, but Patterson is looking at the costs of running, say, Salesforce as a CRM, then adding a social listening product, then adding a marketing automation product, and adding any number of other products for traditional back office functionality. Add it all up, and it would not be hard to exceed that figure.

The question, of course, is whether Microsoft has been able to execute on its converged strategy — and whether the integrated Dynamics components offer similar or better business functionality than more individuated single-purpose solutions."

When comparing costs they said the following;

Quote:

“Many of our competitors have acquired monolithic apps that are very different,” Patterson told me. “They’re really not integrating into the core of the fabric of their solutions … they’re really not being able to unify.”

Read more here: http://venturebeat.com/2014/03/04/microsoft-unifies-almost-everything-in-new-dynamics-crm-marketing-automation-social-and-more/


May Wisdom and the knowledge you gained go with you,



Jim Allen III
Skype: JAllen3D
Everything You Need For Online Success


New Reply
+1


facebook
Like us on Facebook!